Adapt or Die – What Airlines Have To Do To Make a Buck Nowadays (or 37-cents)

What Airlines Have To Do To Make a Buck Nowadays (or 37-cents)

Customers are easily annoyed – but sometimes you can “move” them to accept some necessary changes that they don’t initially like.

Take airlines. Passengers initially grumbled when they could no longer carry heavy, bowling-ball filled luggage on board for free anymore. But airlines continued to lose money due to fuel costs, among other factors. So they stood firm and marketed their new ancillary charges as a “service”, not a “fee”.

And passengers kept flying anyway, adjusted their expectations of service and what they valued, and eventually stopped complaining so much. What are they going to do – walk there?

Changing customer expectations is difficult, but sometimes it’s actually possible.

In spite of all that, U.S. airlines’ 2012 revenue per passenger exceeded costs by only $0.37 (click here to read more).

As always, we welcome your ideas and comments.